Category Archives: events

Driving the New Climate Economy: How Companies and Communities Can Thrive in a Changing World

By Lisa Manley, Director, Sustainability Engagement, Mars

April 7th, 2018

There are clear signals that the climate has changed over the past century. Around the world, people are beginning to feel the effects, from increased average and extreme temperatures, to changes in rainfall patterns, to more severe and less predictable storms. At Mars, we source key agricultural materials from countries and communities that are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. We believe it’s time to take a new approach to addressing this challenge, using our influence and reach to take action that proactively addresses the impacts of climate change within our supply chain and operations. Here are three things our business and others are doing to take action.

Setting Science-Based Targets

 More than 97 percent of actively publishing climate scientists agreehuman activity is extremely likely to be causing the climate-warming trends over the last century. To avoid the worst consequences of climate change, science tells us we should limit global warming to less than the two degree Celsius threshold outlined in the Paris Agreement on climate change. As the saying goes, you can’t manage what you don’t measure. With that in mind, the first thing business should do is trust the science; then align measurable goals and actions around that science.

We looked to the best-available science to guide us in setting our climate goals at Mars. That science says we must reduce the total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across our value chain by 27 percent by 2025 and by 67 percent by 2050(from 2015 levels). That means not only changing how we operate, but also working with partners and suppliers to transform entire value chains so that the ingredients we need to make our best-loved products, like M&Ms and Uncle Bens, are produced with lower environmental impacts. This isn’t an easy goal to meet. But we know it’s what’s necessary to unlock the systemic changes that are needed to benefit people and the planet.

Committing to Renewable Energy

The second thing business should do is look for the places where we can get the most immediate momentum and leverage that momentum for scale. At Mars, energy use is the major driver of our GHG emissions from direct operations. That’s whywe’re big fans of renewable electricity with a goal to eliminate 100 percent of the GHG emissions from our direct operations by 2040. This goal covers the energy use from about 420 sites in more than 80 countries around the world.

We’re already using or purchasing renewable electricity to cover 100 percent of our operations in Belgium, Lithuania, the United Kingdom and the United States. And in 2018, we plan to add Austria, the Czech Republic, France, Mexico, Poland and Spain to this list.In addition to renewable electricity, renewable thermal energy is an important part of our energy use in our factories. For that reason, we helped launch the Renewable Thermal Collaborative – a coalition for organizations that are committed to scaling up renewable heating and cooling at their facilities and dramatically cutting carbon emissions.

Fostering Executive Engagement and Advocacy

The third imperative for business action is to ensure we are aligning what we say with what we do. We need more vocal business advocates for climate action. We are walking this talk through coalitions such as We Are Still In, a declaration made by 2,700 cross-sector leaders in the U.S. to commit to tackling climate change, ensuring a clean energy future and upholding the Paris Agreement. It also can happen through executive advocacy. For example, our Mars chairman, Stephen Badger, recently authored an op/ed piecein The Washington Post,which makes a strong call to action to global businesses on climate change.

We also need to extend our advocacy to include the seats of power and influence within government. That’s why we engage with groups like the Ceres BICEP(Business for Innovative Climate and Energy Policy) Network, to bring business leaders’ voices to Capitol Hill and local legislatures on climate action and clean energy.

For global businesses, it is our time to step up and lead on climate action. This is not just the “right thing to do,” but also makes good business sense; investing in sustainable practices today will help us become stronger, more resilient businesses in the future.

 

SEM HeadshotLisa Manley, Senior Director of Partnerships & Engagement, Mars, Incorporated

Lisa is Senior Director of Partnerships and Engagement within the sustainability team at Mars, Incorporated. In this role, she works to build momentum for the company’s Sustainable in a Generation Plan through compelling communications and engagements as well as uncommon collaboration.  She works with the global sustainability team to create and oversee integrated sustainability strategy; set high-level goals and commitments; assess and drive scaled investments; and manage global sustainability partnerships and programs. Priority platforms for engagement include climate action, water stewardship and land use within Mars’ approach to healthy planet; increasing income, respecting human rights and unlocking opportunities for women within Mars’ approach to thriving people; and food safety & security, product & ingredient renovation and responsible marketing within Mars’ approach to nourishing wellbeing.

Lisa has nearly twenty years of experience working to advance sustainable business growth with consumer goods companies such as Mars and The Coca-Cola Company.

Lisa holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations and a master’s degree in higher education administration from the University of Virginia.  Outside of work, she collects photography and enjoys golf, tennis and biking.

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The Wharton Green Tracker: A Sustainability Impact Pilot for Wharton Students

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The Wharton Green Tracker, our impact tracking app, launched on March 19th! This is a free app available for iOS and Android devices that will connect us all digitally and reward you for doing good by the Wharton community and the world, and for making more sustainable lifestyle choices. Prizes will be offered to the highest point-earner from the prior week every Monday through April 16, as well as for highest scores at the pilot’s conclusion! Follow this link to download on iOS, and this link to download on Android – or simply search “Wharton Green Tracker,” to get started. Use community code “whartonupenn to gain access and start earning your points now!

The Wharton Green Tracker is a collaboration between the Wharton School and MilkCrate, a mission–driven tech company that empowers our clients to track and grow their impact using a platform that can be customized to engage individual behavior to reveal collective impact.  To learn more about MilkCrate, check out their website: http://mymilkcrate.com

Smart Air, Smart City

By Julie Spitkovsky, Netronix, Inc., September 24th, 2017

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Internet of Things (IoT) platform provider Netronix, Inc. and Airthinx Inc. a leader of indoor air quality monitoring, are working together to provide cities around the world with a low cost cloud based solution designed to monitor air quality across schools, universities, hospitals and work spaces. The advantages of cloud based solutions are mapping, tracking, identification of pollutants, measurement of pollutants, data analytics using historical trends, and data mining. Cities stand to benefit from ubiquitous long term monitoring and management of air quality, in real time with instantaneous data available for quick city wide propagation, like geo-mapping incident reports of high pollution areas.

Conventional Methods

Municipalities are hard pressed to find low cost solutions. Conventional methods for collecting indoor air quality data relied heavily on expensive stationary devices. In the United States, for example, the federal government has a network of sensors on towers monitoring particulate matter. The cost of each sensor is $100,000. While in Edinburgh, the city had a single station monitoring PM 2.5 as of 2013. Thus data is collected from only a few instruments but is representative of a broad geographic area.

Interim Solutions

Moving away from conventional methods, many cities are implementing short term initiatives as first steps towards smart city transformation. In 2014, Chicago deployed 50 nodes mounted on lampposts developed with Argonne National Library and the Chicago Department of Innovation and Technology. Barcelona deployed a smart lighting system with embedded air quality sensors that relay information to city agencies and the public as part of their smart city initiative costing in total $230 million. Boston, Los Angeles, and Miami installed park benches equipped with a solar panel that channel electricity via USB ports to charge. Denver in partnership with Google and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) attached mobile sensors to cars throughout a city, collecting 150 million data points over 750 hours of driving time, creating a street level air quality map of the city. Dublin fitted 30 bikes with air sensors measuring carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, smoke, and particulates.

Last year, London attached air quality sensors to ten pigeons to monitor air quality over three days of flights. Louisville gave 300 local residents a sensor that fits on top of their inhaler, tracking locations of inhaler use to help residents manage asthma, collecting 5,400 data points over the 13 months, and identifying hotspots with high inhaler use in order to pinpoint areas with particularly bad air quality.

Philadelphia Transforms

Philadelphia begins the smart city transformation process with its most recent initiative to release open data from city departments. Mayor Kenney also points to ownership and accessibility of light poles and city buildings which can accommodate sensors and wireless access points spread throughout the city. With institutional players like Drexel, Penn, Wharton, CHOP & Comcast, the infrastructure to implement smart city solutions is in place.

Dr. Nasis, founder and CEO of Netronix, Inc. and faculty member of electrical & computer engineering at Drexel, shares insight into the transformation process. “A smart city is a segment of IoT. Many have looked at the smart city as a vertical market on its own, when actually it is a horizontal market with many verticals below it, such as safety, environmental, healthcare, energy, and transportation.”

In the environmental vertical, cities can monitor air quality, water quality and weather. Across the safety vertical, meters already exist that detect gunshots to determine the precise location of the incident helping address crime prevention. Energy, another vertical, can be optimized in street lighting and power plants to keep consumption down. And in the transportation vertical, parking, bus, and traffic can be monitored to enhance quality of life.

‘Many have looked at the smart city as a vertical market on its own, when actually it is a horizontal market with many verticals below it.’

A significant challenge of smart cities is having the tools to address compatibility within and between each vertical. Dr. Nasis cites a “holistic approach, rather than filling in the holes.” The smart parking meter experiment is an IoT solution but also an example of ‘filling in the holes.’ Without an overarching smart city horizontal in place, the initiative did not work. Dr. Nasis concludes, “for a successful smart city, each vertical and the needs of each vertical must be defined, and that requires systemic planning.”

Netronix Ventures, LLC, a subsidiary of Netronix, based out of Philadelphia, aims to start up 100 companies in the next decade using Netronix’s IoT platform. Smart city solutions can be developed in record time, saving 75 percent of the time and costs associated with the development and production of devices and services using conventional methods.

Information Gap

The IoT is about sharing things, interacting, and learning. An information gap leads to a certain kind of decision making. A smart platform creates opportunities to make more informed choices when investing in the city. The smart part is how you collect and make use of the intelligence. By breaking the information gap, the result is a better understanding, more thorough assessment of exposure, heightened awareness, and a complete picture of the data.

Today, the means for large scale and rapid deployment of tens of thousands of devices transforms air quality monitoring and facilitates the collection of quantitative data in any infrastructure. As a direct result of the IoT, a new paradigm emerges in air quality monitoring leading to the much-needed democratization of air quality data. Knowing about the quality of the air you breathe or the water you drink pushes people to take social responsibility.

Financial Feasibility

A significant cost to a smart city transformation is the installation process. 70 percent of city officials say budget constraints are the greatest barrier to adopting smart city solutions. In many cities, a complete overhaul poses a lofty price tag associated with the redesign of buildings and infrastructure. A cloud based solution with deployment of IoT enabled devices eliminates the once costly installation, configuration and calibration associated with industry reference instruments.

Such a significant reduction in overhead and cost per unit lowers the price of the device to a fraction of industrial reference instruments. Cities benefit from investment because there is no need to redesign infrastructure in order to adopt IAQ solutions as part of a widespread smart city plan. One incentive is real time data that anticipates future needs. For example, with built in GPS, the locations of sensors take into account the points in the city with the most exposure to air quality hazards, protecting city dwellers and workers. The data can also be reviewed by a team to determine appropriate next steps. Monitoring air quality becomes financially feasible at room level in any infrastructure.

Smart Sensors

But even with such advancements, few sensors produce reliable enough data to be used in studies or by regulations. In comparison to static monitoring, continuous monitoring enhances high temporal-spatial resolution and variability of air pollution, which so far has been difficult to address. These characteristics, the level of accuracy, precision and identification of microscopic particles in the air, are distinguishing characteristics of air quality monitors in the market. The ability to continuously monitor air quality levels in any infrastructure while preserving the integrity of the measurements, and producing never before seen analytics and information, creates better indoor environments, everywhere in the world.

 

Dr. Vasileios Nasis will be presenting at the Wharton IGEL & SUEZ Conference – Smart Utilities: Bridge to Smart Cities of the Future on September 27.

 

 

Hurricane Harvey – More exposures in the mix than just water and wind!

The full damage and devastation caused by Hurricane Harvey is not yet known and will likely be felt for months to come. While the most pressing issues facing Insureds at this time are the devastating impacts of water and/or wind damage, we all learned some unfortunate lessons from Hurricane Sandy and Katrina specifically caused during storm surges and/or flooding (and after the water recedes) which lead to unexpected clean-up costs and/or pollution legal liability issues (including but not limited to):

  • Historic/Pre-Existing Contamination – Properties having historical or pre-existing contamination could be disturbed and, subsequently, carry pollutants to multiple locations resulting in the cross-contamination of various parts of the property and/or neighboring properties.
  • Landfill Containment Breaches – Heavy water infiltration can cause landslides carrying with it pollutants and/or contaminated waste water into nearby waterways or sensitive third-party receptor areas.
  • Floating Drums of Chemicals and Storage Tanks – Drums containing hazardous waste and storage tanks containing oils and other chemicals could be raised afloat and damaged during transport from their original locations, thereby distributing pollutants downstream.
  • Sewerage Authorities System Back-ups – Sewerage authorities have limited storage and processing capacity, therefore, large unanticipated volumes of water could result in the overflow and/or release of raw untreated sewage.
  • Mold Damage – Mold can grow at alarming rates given proper moisture, temperature range and food source (cellulose-based substrate) following a saturation event.

While property policies may include some pollution-related coverage, it’s imperative that insureds, if they have environmental insurance policies, place their carriers on notice, carefully follow the environmental claim reporting instructions and fully understand any “emergency response” coverage provisions and policy nuances.

It’s prudent for insureds to report their environmental claim to their carriers immediately. If cost estimates for remedial activities are available, they should be sent to the carrier for approval. When submitting proposals, request that the carrier approve the costs as “reasonable and necessary” pending a coverage determination.

 

This piece was originally posted as an op-ed for the Willis Towers Watson Wire. That article can be found here.

 

35611dba53fbc67f528efedc5630ec43Anthony Wagar

Anthony is a Executive Vice President and the National Sales Leader for Willis Towers Watson’s Environmental practice based in New York. He has close to 20 years of experience from a regulatory, underwriting and brokerage perspective. He blogs on matters relating to environmental risk, exposures and insurance.

Exclusive Offer for Sustainable Brands CSR Conference

Submitted by Karina Newman, Community Engagement Coordinator, Sustainable Brands

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Exposure to New Ideas that Drive Change

Sustainable Brands® is the largest peer community of global brand leaders committed to driving value through sustainability-led innovation. Gain insight from global thought leaders who are conducting ground-breaking research and analysis on how businesses can position themselves for success against the backdrop of changing societal needs.

300+ Speakers, 100+ Sessions, 2K+ Attendees Igniting Conversation

SB’17 Detroit will bring a diversity of collaborators and many of the world’s largest global brands together to explore innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing issues. The newly released full program includes deep-dive workshops, inspiring plenaries, insightful breakouts, SB-style spirited networking events, and many NEW surprises, including:

  • New research results from Harris Insights & Analytics, Eco-America, World Resources Institute, Unilever and more.
  • New case studies from innovators at companies ranging from Ford, Apple, Google, and Procter & Gamble, to Chobani, Kellogg, Levi’s, and REI, who are driving breakthrough success by helping their customers and suppliers live better lives.
  • New tools and solutions from companies and organizations like: Amazon, BASF, Dow Chemical, Biomimicry 3.8, C2C Product Innovation Institute, Biogen, Planet Labs, the Closed Loop Fund and more.
  • Plus – Impossible Foods, Lush Cosmetics, Target, Nordstrom, The Nature Conservancy, BLab and hundreds more. Dive in and Enjoy!

Prices Increase THIS WEEK! Exclusive Offer for  the Wharton IGEL community!

Register before prices increase on Friday, April 7, 2017 and save up to $300 on your ticket! And, as part of the Wharton Community, you can save an extra 25% any time with code nwmWHARTONIGELsb17d, so register today for maximum savings.

Managing Transactional Risks in Contaminated Property Cleanups and Redevelopments

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By Dean Jeffert Telego, Owner & President, RTM Communications, Inc.

Managing environmental and financial risk effectively is challenging for all types of corporate and real estate deals from the portfolio to one- off commercial or industrial property transactions.  The environmental risk and liability concerns that arise, from Mergers & Acquisitions to the legacy liabilities associated with the redevelopment of brownfield sites require the use of bullet proof legal tactics, deal strategies that can bracket and or transfer the environmental risks, and the financial tools, such as environmental insurance to close the deal.  In fact, one of the recent trends in corporate transactions is the terms return of capacity and appetite for calculated risk taking by the Property and Casualty (P&C) carriers.  They are providing broader terms and creative manuscripting of environmental insurance such as Pollution Legal Liability (PLL) insurance, to leverage larger and more complex the transaction – whether the deal is a liability buyout or facilitating the closing of a brownfield transaction and its redevelopment.  The transactions are larger in financial terms and the insurance coverage capacity provided is greater.

Real estate market trends are very favorable driving contaminated property transactions toward cleanup and sustainable redevelopment.  Over the past several years, corporate surplus properties have been turning over, influenced by improved economic fundamentals.  There is a surplus of corporate cash on the sidelines along with institutional and foreign sovereign monies looking for higher yields and investing in U.S. real property.  Some focus on brownfield transactions where there are complex infill properties for affordable housing, waterfront, port terminal activity as well as big box store redevelopment.  There is also wide spread construction that is replacing shuttered malls with high end vertical development.

That said, according to a Citizen Commercial Banking report, commercial and industrial property selling activity for 2017 is ramping up. But middle-market decision makers note that valuations may not hold for much longer coupled with unquantifiable economic uncertainty centered on deregulation and tax reform among other externalities, and these phenomenon are further driving market dynamics. The commercial lending markets have seen the slowest increase in construction lending since 2014.  According to a February 8th 2017 Wall Street Journal article, some prominent real-estate investors are reducing their holdings and getting more selective about new deals due to their uncertainty about future market growth after eight years of a bull market.  Asset managers at endowments and pension funds and some private-equity firms are selling more assets and shifting to less risky strategies.  The demand for property may be starting to flag.  Commercial real estate deal volume decreased by $58.3 billion or 11% in 2016 according to Real capital Analytics.

With this mixed news, how does this all portend for contaminated property and brownfield transactional business and site cleanups and redevelopment activities?

Infrastructure is key term to winning Trump administration’s support for brownfield cleanups and redevelopments.  Couch the funding in terms of infrastructure development.  With the past administration, there had been increase cooperation from regulators especially at the state level with the focus on risk-based cleanups and cooperation with the community toward redevelopment.  With the Trump administration we are in a wait and see period relative to the impact to the brownfield cleanups and redevelopment activity that are historically supported by EPA grant monies.  Under a proposal from the Office of management and Budget, the EPA could find its grants to states cut by as much as 30%.  The impact of environmental deregulation and cutbacks in EPA appropriations and staff by 20% to 25% are proposals that would have a material effect on site investigations, cleanups and redevelopment activities leaving funding support to be sought from the private sector.

Environmental risk can impact the success of closing the transaction, valuation of the assets, and the transfer of legacy liabilities. It takes creative funding, the bracketing of environmental risk using rigorous and alternative due diligence and remedial alternatives, and deal structuring techniques grounded in  risk management strategies to assure that the redevelopment or reuse or successful disposition of the surplus or stranded asset(s) can be successfully implemented.

This RTM conference zeroes in on the effect environmental risk has on deal flow and the management of  commercial, industrial and government property types.  We will get into the business tactics and strategies for reducing the uncertainty caused by environmental risk and closing the deals employing creative environmental risk financing and management approaches.  The Conference will also delve into the enhanced value environmental insurance and liability management strategies are bringing to leveraging the M&A activity and the purchasing and disposition of corporate assets and contaminated real estate.

Key presentations will cover:

  • Environmental liability management strategies for successfully transferring corporate surplus properties and closing M&A transactions,
  • Emerging contaminants and new regulatory challenges confronting the financial services industries and property owners/developers,
  • Accelerated transfer of redevelopment and legacy sites into beneficial reuse,
  • Environmental and M&A Buyer – Side insurance leveraging private equity transactions,
  • Creative application of public/private brownfield financings,
  • Extreme weather, climate change and Green Bonds effect on commercial/industrial properties

Upcoming IGEL Event: Bridging the Gap Between Public Health, Energy Efficiency & Poverty

By Shaunak Kulkarni

On November 30th, IGEL will be sponsoring a networking and education event hosted by the Philadelphia Energy Authority (PEA), in conjunction with the students in Wharton’s MGMT 100 course. The event is meant to explore the intersection of public health and the energy efficiency/clean energy industries as well as bring together a broad coalition of community and national voices from non-profit, public, and private sectors across these industries. The Philadelphia Energy Authority is an organization created by Mayor Nutter and City Council in 2010 with the goals of improving energy affordability and sustainability for the City, holding long-term energy contracts, and educating consumers.

In February 2016, PEA launched the Philadelphia Energy Campaign, an initiative to invest in clean energy and energy efficiency in key sectors: city buildings, the school district of Philadelphia, and low-income residential housing. Philly is the poorest big city in the nation and has one of the highest rates of home ownership, with an extraordinary number of low-income homeowners. Philadelphians also have a very high energy cost burden compared to other cities, increasing rates of chronic childhood asthma and lead poisoning, and are often in serious need of major home repairs or maintenance. This event will spotlight programs and organizations that engage at the intersection of energy and health and highlight specific initiatives that address poverty, healthy homes, housing preservation and household expense reduction.

This week’s event will be hosted at the PECO Energy Hall on November 30th, starting at 11:30am. IGEL is the generous sponsor of the event, providing lunch box catering. Three speakers will present in a TED-talk fashion and host a small Q&A panel session afterwards. Students from Wharton’s MGMT 100 course helped coordinate and organize the event. PEA hopes that this event will foster conversation and influence change regarding the intersection of energy and public health in Philadelphia.

Introducing the Young Environmental Professionals Network of Philadelphia

By Bert Barnes, IGEL Graduate Coordinator & second-year MES student

The Philadelphia area is characterized by a wide variety of industries, including medicine, education, financial services, telecommunications, and manufacturing. Over time, numerous institutions have sprung up to aid the development of the professionals working in these industries. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for environmental services, an integral but often-overlooked part of the area’s economic and social fabric.

As an environmental professional who has worked for years in the Philadelphia area, I’m familiar with numerous professional organizations, from the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce to the smaller, specialized organizations. Only one cultivates relationships across functions within the environmental services industry and related fields: Society for Women Environmental Professionals, which is restricted to women. As the environmental dimension of law, insurance, and other disciplines continues to grow in importance (and as Philadelphia emerges as a leader in sustainability), one must wonder why the professional landscape lacks an organization that unites young professionals within these roles.

We are launching the Young Environmental Professionals Network of Philadelphia (YEPN) in response to this void. YEPN will be a place for young professionals working in environmental fields to connect, learn, and develop. Professionals from all of Philadelphia’s industries will be represented within the organization. Already, we have received interest from people in consulting, law, energy, insurance, and engineering. If you’re interesting in learning more, check out our LinkedIn and Facebook groups. Feel free to contact me with questions, as well.

The first YEPN happy hour is taking place from 6 to 8pm on Tuesday, September 27 at Crow and The Pitcher, just south of Rittenhouse Square on 19th Street. Chris Crockett, Chief Environmental Officer of Aqua America, will be speaking at the event. If you have found yourself pondering the questions mentioned above, or if you’re just interested in learning more about your fellow environmental professional and the opportunities in the Philadelphia area, I would encourage you to attend!

Sustainable Brands 2013 – From Revolution to Renaissance

By Silvia Schmid

McDonoughWilliam McDonough at the Sustainable Brands Conference “From Revolution to Renaissance” in San Diego (Courtesy of Sustainable Brands)

Sustainable Brands’ 2013 Conference “From Revolution to Renaissance” took place this past week in San Diego, bringing together hundreds of professionals and thought leaders in sustainability and corporate social responsibility. Sustainable Brands is a supporting member of the Wharton Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (Wharton IGEL).

Though many topics were addressed, three of the most salient themes from the conference were:

  • Transitioning towards transparency and full disclosure
  • Maintaining initial values while navigating through big data
  • Changing perspectives on sustainability

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Energy Efficiency: Still Wasting in the Building

by Silvia Schmid

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Last week’s conference “Building Energy Efficiency: Seeking Strategies that Work” offered the opportunity to discuss the many barriers to advancements in energy efficiency beyond current standards. The event was cohosted by the Wharton Initiative for Global Environmental Leadership (IGEL), the Institute for Urban Research at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center, and the Wharton Small Business Development Center, in partnership with the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub and sponsored by SAP. Speakers and panelists provided valuable insights on the current status of energy efficiency in buildings, addressing topics ranging from consumption measurement and increased transparency, to some of the psychological challenges inherent in adopting more energy efficient behavior. The common message throughout the day was how much remains to be done to make energy efficiency a mainstream priority.

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